Archive for High School Asylum

High School Asylum (Reading from Ch.4)

Posted in Blog, education, Poetry, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2010 by dustus

The following audio clip is a reading from High School Asylum


High School Asylum by Adam Dustus
Copyright 2009
(cover by Keven Lupien)

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Flinch’s Escape (Flash 55)

Posted in Blog, education, Flash Fiction, writing with tags , , , , , , , , on June 21, 2010 by dustus

Jacob Flinch wished his picture graced that milk cartoon. Dog, as nicknamed called, stands pouring over his target. Jake collapses from whiplashing punches from the bully’s wingman. Lunch ladies, cooks in hairnets, attempt breaking-up cheering twelve-year-olds, “Fight! Kick his ass!” Running vice-principal’s whistle cuts through enough bustling undivided attention. Once again, unfair suspension provides Flinch’s escape.

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Care to take a listen?

*55 Fiction (nanofiction)
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Thank You, Judge 20!

Posted in Blog, education, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2010 by dustus

Through a letter from Jessica Strawser, Editor of Writer’s Digest, I was informed that I was not among the winners of the 17th Annual Writer’s Digest International Self-Published Book Awards.

However, attached with the rejection letter was the evaluation of my book, which I have decided to post…
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On a scale of 1 to 5,  with 1 meaning “poor” and 5 meaning “excellent,” please evaluate the following:

Plot: 5,  Grammer: 5,  Character development: 5,  Cover Design: 4

Judge’s Commentary:
What did you like best about this book?

High School Asylum is one of the best written and most original of all the novels I’ve read for this competition—emphasis on original.  I’ve read some good stories and some beautiful stories for this competition, but this is the most original.  Reality is always uncertain in this novel as it is in real life, and no more tenuous is reality than at a high school.  The narrative voice is marvelously engaging and likeable: “Even though I don’t have any real friends other than Jenny, I knew many personal details about other people that only a true friend could know.  So what if Teresa wanted to be Cinderella when we would play war. How could I forget that she always wanted Billy to save her from some fire-breathing Cyclops that sprung from her imagination?  The fantasy was always different, and so were the three of us back then.”  Wonderful dialogue.  Beautiful descriptive details.

How can the author improve this book?

I’m not sure what I want, but it seems the cover could be more attractive and evocative.  In a way, the cartoonish figure on the front of the novel is consistent with certain themes, but certainly all the characters have far more depth than any cartoon.  I’d maybe like to see the image of the “silver moon swelled like a glowing beach ball” on the cover.  In terms of an author fulfilling his intentions, this is just about the best book in the competition—not a book for conventional tastes but a book that should find and deserves to find an appreciative audience of intelligent, broad-minded readers.
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Thank You, Judge 20!

First Review of High School Asylum

Posted in Blog, education, writing with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 28, 2010 by dustus

Hey Everyone.  I have some news to share…

Well, the waiting is over.  This first review of High School Asylum was posted this morning.


Click here to read the review…

eh, strange

Posted in Blog, education, Poetry, writing with tags , , , , on December 26, 2009 by dustus

Echoes less deaf
Smudged composite sketch
Everything sounds
Stuck to my promise
This life, every ounce

Temper-mental
Storms did ignite
Ranting plight
Mid synaptic frights
Frigid shivers none too proud
Having had to beg for my life
Shouts gain ground
Hope you don’t know
What it’s like
So many wrongs
A need to write

An afterward
Prologues deranged
I am not one bit
Profound—
More like
eh, strange