Archive for google

Google and Lansing, a future with fiber optic roots

Posted in Blog, social media with tags , , , , , on March 8, 2010 by dustus

Hi Everyone!  BIG news where I live.
Could it be that Google may be coming?
Click here to check out my article
Thanks 🙂

Googled by Ken Auletta

Posted in Blog, education, social media, Social Media Book Reviews (by A. Dustus), writing with tags , , , , , , , on February 2, 2010 by dustus

Googled: The End Of The World As We Know It… (and I feel fine). I spend a great deal of time each day conducting Google searches. In fact, I consider Google to be one of the most useful tools in my life. Something tells me I am not the only one who feels this way.

While the Internet makes information available to everyone, Google provides users with lightening quick results to search queries. However, as Googled author Ken Auletta points out, that is certainly not all Google does. More than threatening traditional media outlets with targeted advertising and the organization of Web content, Google’s ambitions with book scanning; in addition to their acquisitions of smaller organizations, stirred tensions with companies like Microsoft, Facebook, Apple, the publishing industry, etc… Auletta provides a long list.

Throughout Googled, Auletta also questions the supposed struggle of an engineering ethos claiming “Don’t be evil” in the face of corporate demands for continual growth. I get the sense from reading this book that despite all their accomplishments, Google may operate as a rather “unfocused” business entity. In providing a corporate conceptual framework for his assertion, Auletta draws from interviews he conducted with Google officers to make the case that Google could be generating unprecedented income even beyond what they have already amassed and redistributed.

Ken Auletta also explains how and why Google has earned the reputation for being one of the best brands in the world. In addition, he presents future challenges Google faces through foreseeable competitive struggles, including those that involve legal proceedings. Questions of disorganization and hubris are raised—perhaps unfairly. Judge for yourself.

While I am not a fan of reading about corporate structures and business histories, for the most part I did like this book. What I enjoyed most was reading about the respective backgrounds of Google founders, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, the inspiration they found in Richard Feynman and Nikola Tesla, their intellectual upbringings, and their advanced studies at Stanford. I wish Googled was more about the founders and their intellectual pursuits rather than business deals. Still it was an eye-opening read.
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Ken Auletta has written Annals of Communication columns and profiles for The New Yorker magazine since 1992. He is the author of eleven books, including five national bestsellers… (read more)

What Would Google Do? (book review)

Posted in Blog, education, people, social media, Social Media Book Reviews (by A. Dustus), writing with tags , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2009 by dustus

Picture 140I would like to begin this review by first warning the reader: This is book more than about Google and its massive sphere of influence.  What Would Google Do? by Jeff Jarvis (copyright 2009) is an optimistic cultural statement in both scope and form.

Google is more than about the retrieval of posted information. For many individuals it represents an ideal, alongside being a major economic player on the global stage.  As an author or business entity today, you cannot build your “online platform” without understanding Google and the tangible effects of their continual rapid development. As newspapers, television, and other older media may have lost the trust of the people, revenue, and perhaps the overall faith of their consumers (perhaps deservedly so, or not).  Established rule, unyielding corporations, and inefficient bureaucracies—they all change as Google provides immediate relevant information to the masses.

Google does not own the content to everything out there—it simply organizes that information. They make billions selling targeted ads all over the Internet. To me, Google represents infinite possibilities and instant help in the form of immediately answering questions. (In fact, I probably searched Google at least 100x myself while writing this review).  Up until reading this book, I had no idea the extent to which Google can unearth answers.  Throughout What Would Google Do? Jeff Jarvis not only provides useful tips for search engine optimization (SEO); he also presents a cogent argument for Google’s results to be considered as the foundation of a theoretical democratic-meritocracy (a “demotocracy”—I “googled it” to find the term does not exist), which represents the collective will of the people based on what they most seek.  To put it another way, our clicks provide information for what is relevant based on what we all search.

While it may be common knowledge that Google owns the two popular services Blogger and You Tube, there are numerous Google research and philanthropic endeavors in areas aimed at discovering means of more efficient energy, improving the knowledge base of countless fields of inquiry, and connecting individuals, companies, products, and services all through a strikingly simple home page.  Google, along with other prominent figures in this digital zeitgeist (like Facebook, craigslist, Twitter, Digg, MySpace), represent more than a great platform for discovery.  In WWGD? Jarvis elucidates the general philosophical affinities that the aforementioned behemoths of social media seem to encourage.

Perhaps the most fascinating aspect of What Would Google Do? for me is that I find myself contemplating a connected world where the only limits are myself, the extent to which I pursue searchable choices, and the potential possibilities of connecting with others through my inquiries.  As an author trying to build my online platform, I state unequivocally that WWGD? helped me to understand what needs to be accomplished in order to truly be “searchable.”

Bottom Line:   What Would Goggle Do? = Must Read
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Jeff Jarvis (born July 15, 1954) is an American journalist. He is the former television critic for TV Guide and People magazine, creator of Entertainment Weekly, Sunday editor and associate publisher of the New York Daily News, and a columnist on the San Francisco Examiner.